bono: interviewed

read this and see what you think…

Is Bono, the lead singer and songwriter for the rock group U2, a Christian? He says he is and writes about Christianity in his lyrics. Yet many people question whether Bono is “really” a Christian, due to his notoriously bad language, liberal politics, and rock star antics (though he has been faithfully married for 23 years). But in a new book of interviews, Bono in Conversation by Michka Assayas, Bono, though using some salty language, makes an explicit confession of faith.

The interviewer, Mr. Assayas, begins by asking Bono, Doesn’t he think “appalling things” happen when people become religious? Bono counters, “It’s a mind-blowing concept that the God who created the Universe might be looking for company, a real relationship with people, but the thing that keeps me on my knees is the difference between Grace and Karma.”

The interviewer asks, What’s that? “At the center of all religions is the idea of Karma. You know, what you put out comes back to you: an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, or in physics—in physical laws—every action is met by an equal or an opposite one,” explains Bono. “And yet, along comes this idea called Grace to upend all that. . . . Love interrupts, if you like, the consequences of your actions, which in my case is very good news indeed, because I’ve done a lot of stupid stuff.”

The interviewer asks, Like what? “That’s between me and God. But I’d be in big trouble if Karma was going to finally be my judge,” says Bono. “It doesn’t excuse my mistakes, but I’m holding out for Grace. I’m holding out that Jesus took my sins onto the Cross, because I know who I am, and I hope I don’t have to depend on my own religiosity.”

Then the interviewer marvels, “The Son of God who takes away the sins of the world. I wish I could believe in that.”

“The point of the death of Christ is that Christ took on the sins of the world, so that what we put out did not come back to us, and that our sinful nature does not reap the obvious death,” replies Bono. “It’s not our own good works that get us through the gates of Heaven.”

The interviewer marvels some more: “That’s a great idea, no denying it. Such great hope is wonderful, even though it’s close to lunacy, in my view. Christ has His rank among the world’s great thinkers. But Son of God, isn’t that farfetched?”

Bono comes back, “Look, the secular response to the Christ story always goes like this: He was a great prophet, obviously a very interesting guy, had a lot to say along the lines of other great prophets, be they Elijah, Muhammad, Buddha, or Confucius. But actually Christ doesn’t allow you that. He doesn’t let you off that hook. Christ says, No. I’m not saying I’m a teacher, don’t call me teacher. I’m not saying I’m a prophet. I’m saying: ‘I’m the Messiah.’ I’m saying: ‘I am God incarnate.’ . . . So what you’re left with is either Christ was who He said He was—the Messiah—or a complete nutcase. . . . The idea that the entire course of civilization for over half of the globe could have its fate changed and turned upside-down by a nutcase, for me that’s farfetched.”

( ht to feedyoursoul.org.uk)

Advertisements

5 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by lisaho on August 23, 2007 at 4:09 pm

    If you want more insight in the faith of Bono read Steve Stockman’s “Walk On: The Spiritual Journey of U2”.

    Reply

  2. Posted by Chris S on April 24, 2009 at 6:42 am

    Bono is hard to figure out some days. His songs have a hint of spirituality yet seem political in most cases.

    However, he’s never pretended to be a Christian Artist in the vein of Petra, Third Day or even Switchfoot, but wears his Christianity outward to those who ask.

    To a conservative Christian, he may not be a great example. However, he;s out in the trenches and appears to share his faith openly. He opens doors for other to walk in, then its up to the Church Body to minister to each other on what constitutes a Christian walk.

    Reply

  3. Posted by frank keefe on April 24, 2009 at 8:13 am

    Matthew 7:21 “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter.

    I apply this not only to myself but also Bono.Its one thing to claim that you are a Christian but another to walk in His righteousness.Only God knows Bono’s heart but he must remember he cannot serve two masters.That means using foul language and being hip to the rock crowd just brings Christ down.As Jesus said you must put off the old man and put on the new its a change I must say I havent see in Bono in the past but have to admit I havent seen clips of him lately.

    Jesus said to the woman caught in the act of adultery Go sin no more.Was he saying that sin would never be part of her life in the future NO!but the life she once led must be a thing of the past and the life she should live now should be for God.

    Reply

  4. I am surprised at myself for enjoying Bono’s logic between grace/Karma so much. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve always been a U2 fan, but never because I secretly hoped he might be a Christian. Lord knows my record collection is composed mainly of “secular” music.

    Although I don’t always hold the same political views or use the same “salty” language, I think that these qualifiers for who is ‘really’ a christian seeped into Christianity over the past couple hundred years.

    Case in point: a friend recently said Bono couldn’t be a Christian because he was seen drinking beer in Rattle and Hum. I told him that for the first 1800 years of Christian tradition this ‘qualifier’ was never considered even a qualifier, but rather a part of the Christian tradition.

    Thanks for posting…interesting article.

    Reply

  5. […] get me wrong, I love U2′s music. I love to listen to Bono talk about grace and greed. But I think we’re getting it […]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: