church staff could learn from Apple Store staff

J.R. Briggs was recently inspired by his trip to an Apple store in New York. One thing he remarked about was his interaction with an employee. Here was his thought (read the whole article here):

The question his boss asks him at the end of the day isn’t “How much product did you sell today?” but instead, “Who did you talk to today and what were their stories?” The question his boss asks him at the end of the day isn’t “How much product did you sell today?” but instead, “Who did you talk to today and what were their stories?”

There is a lot of talk about church metrics and how big our churches are or how many butts fill our seats on Sunday mornings. What if there were more talks about the stories we hear each week?

I’d bet a couple of things would happen:

  1. We’d stop being concerned if attendance went up or down, and we’d start being concerned with whether or not we learned anything new about those in our faith community.
  2. Church staff would have an INCREDIBLY clearer picture of what programs/ministries/sermons/studies/etc. were needed in the life of those in the faith community.
  3. Our ministries would be exponentially better, more effective, more impactful, more meaningful, longer lasting, more fulfilling, etc…..
  4. We’d become the only place in a person’s life that they could show up and feel like someone was trying to get to know them better.
  5. “Being known” would be a tremendous feeling. Probably addicting (if you don’t think so, read anyone’s twitter or facebook page).
  6. They’d tell others about it and probably start to mirror that kind of behavior.
  7. More people would want to be a apart of that faith community.
  8. Attendance would go up as a by-product of all that. But if it didn’t, no one would be too concerned as long as we were learning more and more about the lives of others.

All that WOULD happen merely as a result of changing our metrics.

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